Lessons Learned: Part 2

Lessons Learned From the Kids with Diverse Abilities:

I say diverse abilities because one thing that I have learned from working and playing with children and adults with developmental disabilities is that they understand more than neuro-typical children and adults do. You may understand if you’ve ever heard the phrase “Dance like no one is watching,” and if you crave the freedom and joy that behaving that way can bring.

Silhouette, group of happy children playing on meadow, sunset, summertime

They live their lives like no one is watching. They may not even have the ability to sensor their thoughts. This really brings a sense of freedom and joy that no one else (I know) can truly understand. It is the rest of the world who has a problem with what a child like this does and says. If society could be “okay” with this, than they could be “okay” with truly BEING authentic with who they are. These children taught me so much about being authentic and not worrying about what other people see or think. It was years later, when I became a mother again, that I realized just how much they taught me.

Stuck on Skip: The Patterns of Life

My son absolutely loves letters, shapes, numbers, and colors. He can do different activities, but spends majority of his day focusing on the things that he loves most. He loves them because he understands them and they are always constant. A q is always a q, and b always comes after a. One plus one always equals two, and a triangle will always have three sides. Or in his case, his favorite shape, a dodecahedron, will always have twenty sides. A dodecawhat? Just trust me and stay with me here.

My son spends most of his day studying these things and lining them up. In fact, he lines everything up. I often even know he was in a room because of the telltale evidence he leaves behind. For example, the other day I knew he went into my bathroom because when I went in there, there was a line of tampons on the floor organized by color. He doesn’t have all the order that he needs in life so he creates it, and I’m pretty sure he would do this all day long if I would let him. Of course the one exception is that he likes the couch throw pillows on the floor and I like them lined up on the couch. Can’t figure that one out!

Happy family on meadow at summer sunset

The point is that every day I feel like we often do the same things, over and over. I often even hear the same phrases and words over and over again. For me, this is the norm, and I am happy to live it, but sometimes I can’t help but feel like his life and mine are stuck on skip. Like a record that just can’t get over that scratch, or for any youngsters out there, a DVD that is skipping back to the same part. Or for even younger folks, buying a movie on apple tv that won’t play through. Isn’t it amazing that no matter how far we advance as a society, our issues are still the same?

Anyway, every day is similar and it is a good thing in our house when we find something new to line up or perhaps even change the pattern, because that is change! In fact, my son is so creative in creating new patterns that when family was recently over we all felt like we were doing mind puzzles trying to find his reason and new pattern choice. I see it like he is leaving mini works of art all throughout the home. If you could see some of his more intricate letter designs I doubt you would describe it any other way. I often call him a letterologist  or letter ninja if there were such a thing.  

Video Modeling: Making a Video

The following is a list of tips to create and use your own video modeling tool.

  • Videos are short, usually 2-5 minutes, or even shorter
  • The student will typically watch the video 3-5 times at one session
  • The student will then practice the skill/behavior targeted in the video. The teacher might say, “Now it’s your turn, just like the video” and support the student as they attempt the skill/behavior
  • Continue to create opportunities to practice the new skill at natural and planned times throughout the day

LRvideomodeling

Ways to highlight important information:

  • Slow motion
  • Up Close- zoom in
  • Highlight single words
  • Use text
  • Use symbols
  • Use magnetic letters for titles

Remember to:

  • Title your video
  • Limit distractions
  • Highlight relevant information
  • Incorporate student drawings
  • Secure photo/video releases from parents
  • Don’t over think it…get started and then revise as needed

LRvideomodeling2

By Lisa Rogers

Click HERE to help support Lisa Rogers’ video modeling project, “The Orion Files.”

11 Things Not to Say to an ASD Parent

It wasn’t until the day that one of my children was diagnosed with both Autism Spectrum Disorder and Sensory Processing Disorder that I realized quite how upsetting the topic was to many people. I still do not know why labels that are used for medical purposes, that open doors for children in need, can be such an issue for so many. After all, the word “Autism” to me is just a word. My child is still my child, and the world we live in may be unique at times, but it is also extraordinary.

I’m not sure if people just don’t know what to say, or if they are simply uninformed and inexperienced. As a parent of two children who face specific challenges, I can assure you that there are a list of things that I have had said to me that are anything but helpful.

Here are just a few:

Why Feel Blame?

In our home it’s a gift to have Aspergers. That’s what we believe and that’s what our son believes to his core. While researchers and scientists continue their quest to discover the source of Autism, I know I love my son exactly for who and what he is.

Jennifer

His uniqueness and contributions to the world seem advanced, and his intense interests and thought processes are from a different mind, literally. What a gift! This, of course, is not without its challenges but I’ve always felt privileged to raise a son on the spectrum. Because of this, I believe that a mother feeling ‘blame’ should never come into the equation.