The Brilliant Artistry of Darby Sparks

While my parents received the diagnosis of High-Functioning Autism when I was very young, I wasn’t told until I was around 17. I never felt any different than others I suppose, but I did notice that adults didn’t treat me the same and that the other kids didn’t play with me. Later I would go to speech therapy and an occasional visit to the counselor.

The Brilliant Artistry of Darby Sparks

I’m proud of a couple of things. Proud of my art, proud of my ability to read and spell. I can look at a word and break it down….into it’s meaning and origin. I enjoy reading books on Egyptians and fiction such as Stephen King and J.R.R. Tolkien.

I’ve been drawing since I remember but it wasn’t until around age 12 that I realized I had a true gift. I was able to create and give life to these two-dimensional pieces of paper. My ability to draw is an outlet and has always allowed me to let emotion in….it was a gift. While other people are good at sports…I have my art.

I like to draw people. There are so many different emotions you can do with people…especially around the eyes. One of my favorite drawings is of a bellydancer. (shown). I used to go Middle Eastern restaurant and they would have a belly dancers. I would go drink some tea and draw when one day they can over to the table and noticed I was drawing Disney characters. The teacher came over and commissioned me to draw the graduating class. The picture I kept was my favorite as I liked the way the sun shown down on her.

When asked my advice for those parents just getting their child’s diagnosis of autism? First and foremost, be patient. I wasn’t social or able to make eye contact. Your child may not be able to communicate the way you want them to. Take the time to get to know your child. Try to help them with school as much as you can. Be there for them…it makes a difference.

 By: Darby Sparks

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Jennifer Allen

After an extensive career broadcast marketing, Jennifer and her husband searched for answers when their oldest son hit the kinder years with great difficultly. After finally learning that their oldest son had Aspergers Syndrome, she left her career in television and became a full time mother to both of her sons. Jennifer elicited the participation of her sons and together they produced several independent programs including a children’s animated series titled Ameriquest Kids (now distributed by Landmark Media) as well as her documentary and book titled, Coping to Excelling: Solutions for school-age children diagnosed with High-Functioning Autism or Aspergers Syndrome. The need for more information encouraged Jennifer to elicit a team of autism experts to provide weekly, original content to a website free to anyone seeking to live their best under the diagnosis of High-Functioning Autism/Aspergers Syndrome… appropriately titled: Aspergers101.com.

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3 thoughts on “The Brilliant Artistry of Darby Sparks

  1. I found out that I had Aspergers in year 7. I knew I always needed help at school and I didnt really have any friends. Since leaving school in 2008 I have been through a bit of an Emotional rollercoaster. I went through a stage where I had absolutely no friends till an old schol friend who was sort of in the same rut as I was. She introduced me to her friends at karaoke and I started to sing. Anywho, that really opened me up and made me alot more confidant. Now I have figured out what I want to do with my life. I'm living my dream as a photographer and I love it! I still feel somewhat uncomfortable in front of new people but i'll get the hang of it. Its something I am strongly passionate about. To all the other people with Aspergers, You can do whatever you want to, just as long as you believe in yourself!

    • Hello Emilee…..thank you for sharing your story! Those early years (which are mostly social in nature) seem to be the most difficult but like you discovered, the older you get you come into your own. Photography is such a talent! If you are interested in furhter telling your story and showing some of your work (photos) let us know and we’ll feature you in our Autistically Speaking section! Take care….