Do all children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) have Autism?

Aspergers101 Medical Vlog series looks at Sensory Processing. In this clip Adrienne Gaither, OTR, C-SIPT with the Autism Community Network, answers the question: Do all children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) have Autism?

The Autism Community Network is located in San Antonio, Texas USA with an emphasis on collaboration with autism service providers, early diagnosis, and providing services to underserved young children and their families.

Housing Community for those with Disablities

disabilityscoop
March 3, 2015

It’s a concept gaining acceptance nationwide, providing a stimulating community setting for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are capable of living with some degree of independence. Housing Community for those with Disablities includes 132 apartments and a recreation center with pool and commercial kitchen.  “It’s been a long road; God has called me to do this,” Jack Kosik said recently at the 56-acre site that soon will be developed into a gated community for people with developmental disabilities. Already, as many as 227 parents and guardians have indicated interest in placing loved ones at Noah’s Landing, Kosik said. “We believe we’re starting a tsunami. If we do it right, this will be a national model.” No doubt!

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Academic Bingo Card

Work avoidance seems to be an ongoing issue across different settings and grade levels. In a previous blog, we discussed the use of a checklist with a strategic “sandwiching” of a less preferred activity in between two highly preferred activities. This strategy is often very effective in building success on academic activities that the student would prefer to avoid. However, no one thing works for every student, as you have probably discovered for yourself. So this week, we will explore a similar strategy that is in a different format . . . a BINGO card!

Academic Bingo Card

Autism: A History of Blame

There was a new study recently posted on DisabilityScoop titled, Parent-Led Intervention May Lower Kids’ Autism Risk . Researchers again are dusting off the premise that Autism can be ‘cured’ by ways of changing the parental nurturing interaction early in life. Although I read the study and it wasn’t as insulting as in comparison to some earlier theories, I still felt it was resting on the feet of some very destructive autism fallacies of the past.

Autistic Child Blurred Behind Pane Of Glass

I know this is a little different than what I usually write here, but after some research into the subject this really struck me as interesting and I thought I’d share some Autism History. It may answer the question as to why, we as mothers, either inherently have guilt about our kids or why people are determined to inflict this on us.

It is not surprising that this stigma originated with Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis. Psychoanalysis is based on the concept of the unconscious mind, and it focuses on emotional disturbance. Freud believed that the cause of psychological disorders were the result of some early childhood experience of trauma, rather than organic factors in the brain or nervous system. Freud’s work put particular emphasis on the first few years of life because he theorized that early childhood experiences were the root of unhealthy developments in the human mind. In my opinion and that of many others, Freud placed a lot of blame on mother issues and unhealthy sexual deviances and complexes.

Boy with Asperger’s Syndrome hospitalized in brutal school attack

Fox 8 Cleveland
FEBRUARY 26, 2015

So heartbreaking and yet familiar. Bullying happens at every level in life but for those on the spectrum, according to Dr. Tony Attwood, you have about a 100% chance of it happening during the school years. This 12 year old with Aspergers was beaten for sticking to what was familiar.

Boy with Asperger’s Syndrome hospitalized in brutal school attack

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Summer College Experiences

The summer between high school graduation and the first day of college classes can be both exciting and anxiety-producing. It can be for anyone, really, but it may be especially so for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Challenges with executive functioning and theory of mind may make aspects important to the transition– planning for it, for example, or knowing who to go to for necessary advice to help with the transition – a significant hurdle to overcome.

Can Success be Predicted for College Students with ASD?

Having a practical experience on a college campus prior to the move-in day may be a good way to overcome some of the challenges associated with transition to college. Marshall University first developed a college experience for high school students diagnosed with ASD in 2008. Each summer dozens of rising seniors (students who have completed their junior year of high school and are entering their senior year) spend five weeks on campus.

Preventing Meltdowns

There is nothing amusing about “the meltdown”. It is reflective of a complete loss of control of the person with an autism spectrum disorder. It is often loud, risky at times, frustrating, and exhausting.

Here is a video that explains meltdowns from the perspective of someone living with autism.  Feel free to share with others, as it is available through youtube.

 Ask an Autistic . . . What is a meltdown?

One might say that the loss of control overtakes the child. They need their teacher or parent to recognize this and help them to regain control, as they are unable to do so on their own. A child with autism in the middle of the meltdown desperately needs help to regain composure.

Stuck on Skip: The Patterns of Life

My son absolutely loves letters, shapes, numbers, and colors.  He can do different activities, but spends majority of his day focusing on the things that he loves most.  He loves them because he understands them and they are always constant.  A q is always a q, and b always comes after a.  One plus one always equals two, and a triangle will always have three sides.  Or in his case, his favorite shape, a dodecahedron, will always have twenty sides.  A dodecawhat?  Just trust me and stay with me here.  He spends most of his day studying these things and lining them up.  In fact, he lines everything up.  I often even know he was in a room because of the telltale evidence he leaves behind.  For example, the other day I knew he went into my bathroom because when I went in there, there was a line of tampons on the floor organized by color.  He doesn’t have all the order that he needs in life so he creates it, and I’m pretty sure he would do this all day long if I would let him.  Of course the one exception is that he likes the couch throw pillows on the floor and I like them lined up on the couch.  Can’t figure that one out!

Happy family on meadow at summer sunset

The point is that every day I feel like we often do the same things, over and over.  I often even hear the same phrases and words over and over again.  For me, this is the norm, and I am happy to live it, but sometimes I can’t help but feel like his life and mine are stuck on skip.  Like a record that just can’t get over that scratch, or for any youngsters out there, a DVD that is skipping back to the same part. Or for even younger folks, buying a movie on apple tv that won’t play through.  Isn’t it amazing that no matter how far we advance as a society, our issues are still the same?  Anyway, every day is similar and it is a good thing in our house when we find something new to line up or perhaps even change the pattern, because that is change!  In fact, he is so creative in creating new patterns that when family was recently over we all felt like we were doing mind puzzles trying to find his reason and new pattern choice.  I see it like he is leaving mini works of art all throughout the home.  If you could see some of his more intricate letter designs I doubt you would describe it any other way.  I often call him a letterologist  or letter ninja if there were such a thing.