Child with Asperger’s? Insight from someone who knows

Samuel Allen insightSo you’ve just found out that your child has Asperger’s Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism. What’s the next step? As an 18-year-old with Asperger’s Syndrome, I can provide some insight:

People with Asperger’s seem to lean towards wanting space from others, and in some cases, family members as well.

If an Aspie is feeling unnerved by loud noises in the house, give them space and let their room be their sanctuary; it’s their quiet zone.

It has calmed me down in the past, so it should work for other Aspies as well. I’m mindful not to keep music and TV in other rooms too loud.

People with Asperger’s also have sensory issues most of the time. For example, certain smells or sights may set off an unsettling feeling in the Aspie. Sometimes the child may not be able to tell you why they’re unsettled because they don’t know what it is, but in most cases it’s usually a sensory issue, like an odd painting or some sounds that the child may not like.

Maybe their clothes or even the texture of their clothes can set them off and they may not be able to tell you. So when buying clothes, keep in mind that some clothes may not be for the Aspie. Also, certain smells may not be pleasant. For example, if a child is sick at a restaurant, then leave the restaurant.
Another thing about Aspies is that they always tend to have special interests, like-in my case-science and video games.

As Dr. Temple Grandin once told me, find people with shared interests. If they like space, then take them to a planetarium. If they like trains, take them to a train museum.

Aspies have also been known to acclimate well with animals, almost as if the Aspie can communicate with animals better than regulars. Any way you put it, Aspies have many differences than normal people and you, as their parent can help make these differences either a nightmare or a dream.

By Samuel Allen

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Jennifer Allen

After an extensive career broadcast marketing, Jennifer and her husband searched for answers when their oldest son hit the kinder years with great difficultly. After finally learning that their oldest son had Aspergers Syndrome, she left her career in television and became a full time mother to both of her sons. Jennifer elicited the participation of her sons and together they produced several independent programs including a children’s animated series titled Ameriquest Kids (now distributed by Landmark Media) as well as her documentary and book titled, Coping to Excelling: Solutions for school-age children diagnosed with High-Functioning Autism or Aspergers Syndrome. The need for more information encouraged Jennifer to elicit a team of autism experts to provide weekly, original content to a website free to anyone seeking to live their best under the diagnosis of High-Functioning Autism/Aspergers Syndrome… appropriately titled: Aspergers101.com.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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