SODAS Method: Choosing Disclosure of Your Disability in the Workplace

In a previous blog we defined full disclosure of your disability, and accommodations. Often times individuals will have more than one disability, but only one of them may be a concern in the workplace. What I mean by this is that one disability may stay hidden while the other one is visible.

SODAS Method Choosing Disclosure

As I have worked through the disclosure process with my clients, they frequently only want to let one disability be known. To work through this we often use the SODAS method, which stands for: Situation Options Disadvantages Advantages and Solution.

Hard Skills with Aspergers: Teachable Abilities and Skill Sets in the Workplace

I have often been asked: What is the hardest part of your job? The majority of the time the answer is discovering what skills my clients have to offer to an employer. As an employment specialist I recognize that prospective employers are talking about hard skills.

Employees with special skills wanted - job interview candidates

So, what are hard skills?

Autism in the Workplace: ‘Always thought you were a bit weird’

ASTEP: Asperger Syndrome Training and Employment Partnership

We’re often asked if individuals on the spectrum should disclose at work. While we at ASTEP have our personal views on this topic, what we do is help each individual think through their situation and come to a decision that is comfortable for them. The below blog post is one of the best we’ve seen by an individual sharing their experience about being someone with autism in the workplace, and what that means when disclosed and when not disclosed.

You can find the original post from The Guardian here.

 Not everyone wants to be a part of the office Secret Santa. Photograph: Getty Images

Not everyone wants to be a part of the office Secret Santa. Photograph: Getty Images

A late diagnosis of autism meant I struggled with the alien codes of small talk and office politics – until I started work at an autism charity.

I was sitting in a doctor’s office, describing yet again how a day at work could be hell. I told him why sharing the same space, listening to my colleagues’ music/small talk/breathing drove me mad and why someone saying “good morning” could feel like a personal invasion. The doctor was new, young; he gave a nod of recognition and then he said something strange: “I think you may be autistic”.

Employment Resources for College Students with Disabilities

ASTEP - Asperger Syndrome Training & Employment Partnership

ASTEP offers an important list of resources for college students with Aspergers, who are looking for employment or internship opportunities. Read through the summaries of what each organization offers, and click on the names listed to go to their websites. You can find the original post on ASTEP here.

Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities is a professional association comprised of more than 600 colleges and universities, and over 500 major national employers. COSD’s mission is to improve the employment rate of college students and recent graduates with disabilities on a national basis, by forming collaborative relationships between campus’ Disabilities Services and Career Services offices, and assisting employers in providing internships, recruiting, and hiring college graduates with disabilities.

How to Have a Successful Interview with Aspergers: Tips for Asking Questions

ASTEP - Asperger Syndrome Training and Employment Partnership

Dr. Temple Grandin once told my son Sam: “when you’re looking for employment, you must show your work. Indeed! For someone diagnosed with High Functioning Autism or Aspergers Syndrome, you must rely on the merit of your work, because oftentimes challenging social cues can override a large portion of the interviewing process.

Depositphotos_18240331_s-2015

Asperger Syndrome Training and Employment Partnership provides a very good checklist to review before you go through the interview process.

Training for Employers on Workplace Diversity and Asperger Syndrome

Asperger Syndrome Training and Employment Partnership

As part of our continued segment on Employment in partnership with ASTEP, today we bring you a sample of ASTEP’s training offerings for Employers.

employment, employer training

Seeking employment is a crucial topic for those with Aspergers and High Functioning Autism. ASTEP offers critical tools, tips, and training for both employers hiring potential employees with Aspergers, and for those on the spectrum searching for employment.

Creating a Network for Those with Aspergers in the Workforce

Aspergers: Getting a Job

Once you have written your “one-minute commercial” and are confident telling others about yourself, it is time to start building your network. What is a network? A network is any friend, family member, mentor, teacher, or professional that can help you in your quest for employment. Building a network takes time, but can be extremely beneficial.

People at Work

Most people get jobs, because of someone they know. New employers usually feel more confident when they hire a person recommended by someone they know. Hiring a new employee is expensive so they want to go with someone, who others can personally attest to their skills.

So, who should be in your network? What is the best way to go about creating a network?

Today’s discussion with Dr. Temple Grandin

Automation puts jobs in peril yet presents opportunity!

While waiting during a flight delay, Dr. Temple Grandin who is well known for her inventions with livestock handling facilities, best-selling author  and advocate on behalf of those with Autism, granted me her time over the phone today. Among the myriad of topics discussed was her strong recommendation for me to read today’s headline published in USA Today. The headline reads: AUTOMATION IS THE GREATEST THREAT TO THE ECONOMY, BUT MAY ALSO BE ITS BIGGEST OPPORTUNITY. Temple went on to say that for those with a specialized interests, who embrace robotics, artificial intelligence and automation may find themselves in a good position within our future workplace.

Within the USA Today article, Bill Brennan, audit transformation leader for PricewaterhouseCoopers, states that he is now hiring employees with backgrounds in science, technology and engineering. “We need those individuals to help us as we get into data analysis, analytics, data security, cloud computing. The future employee is going to have a combination of those skills,” Brennan said.

A robotic arm removes a section of wire from a computerized two-dimensional bending machine before carrying it to an automated welder at Marlin Steel in Baltimore, which has embraced automation to remain competitive with foreign manufacturers. (Photo: Jasper Colt, USA TODAY)

Dr Grandin said this article is a must-read for anyone on the Autism Spectrum or with Asperger Syndrome for many of these job availabilities will match their skills set. Upon her encouragement, we’ve posted the article for you to read below.

Special report: Automation puts jobs in peril AUTOMATION IS THE GREATEST THREAT TO THE ECONOMY, BUT MAY ALSO BE ITS BIGGEST OPPORTUNITY. Nathan Bomey , USA TODAY

by: Jennifer Allen

 

Peter Thiel: Asperger’s can be a big advantage in Silicon Valley

Peter Thiel — the PayPal founder, Facebook investor, and bestselling author — hates groupthink.

He avoids hiring MBAs, since he says they tend to be “high extrovert/low conviction people,” a combination of traits that “leads towards extremely herd-like thinking and behavior.”  Similarly, he says that “people end up behaving more lemming-like” in places like San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood, where tons of tech companies are crammed into a .635 square mile area. All that socialization leads to conformity, he argues, preventing people from coming up with original, innovative ideas.

To Thiel, originality is the name of the entrepreneurial game, since it’s the quickest route to gaining a monopoly, as he says Google did with search. From that logic, he argues that a psychological condition usually thought of as a disorder — Asperger’s syndrome — provides a startup advantage.

I hired someone with Asperger’s – now what?

Last January after a fresh snowstorm, my 9-year-old son asked me to help him build a snowman. I told him that I would be out to help shortly.

A couple of minutes later he came running back yelling, “Dad, it’s melting!”

That got my attention. It was sub-30 outside, so how could a snowman be melting?

CNNARTICLE

(Photo and Article originally from CNN)

I followed him as he ran down the hall to his bedroom. In the middle of his room was a 4-foot tall snowman, melting away.

While I removed the snowman and cleaned the remaining slush and mud, I asked him why he did it. He said, in a very matter-of-fact-tone, “It’s cold outside.”

My son has Asperger’s syndrome. For him, building a snowman in his bedroom because it was cold outside was a logical solution to a problem.

Because of my son, “Aspies” hold a special place in my heart. So whenever I hear someone in my industry talk about hiring an Aspie, I cringe just a little. Because in technology, saying you’ve hired an Aspie is like code to say that you’ve hired a machine.