Teen’s Inspiring Video Shows How He Overcame Autism Odds

Article by: Jennifer O’Neill (repost)

When Michael Whary was diagnosed with Autism as a child, doctors told his parents he wouldn’t be able to drive a car or even ride a bike.

Photo: YouTube/Michael Whary

“Well, they’re wrong,” now 16-year-old Michael declares — while two-wheeling, behind the wheel of a Hummer, and speed cruising around on an ATV— in an inspiring video he created as his community service project to become an Eagle Scout. The 13-minute film, titled “Autism Awareness,” has scored nearly 2,500 views on YouTube since it was posted in December. It’s also been featured in local news coverage in his hometown of Elyria, Ohio. What makes the high school sophomore’s film stand out, though, is that he addresses parents in the piece in an effort to “send them a message of hope,” he told WKYC.

An Autism diagnosis is “not your fault!” a slide introducing his footage proclaims to parents. “You are not alone!” Whary’s goal with the short film is to encourage parents to seek out early education opportunities for their children on the spectrum. Mom Judi Whary tells Yahoo Parenting her son, “knows how initially, diagnosis can be so devastating to the whole family. But the faster you get over the devastation and get to the education, the better.”


It worked for the teen, who takes viewers on a spirited walk through his old preschool, the Children’s Development Center in Amherst, Ohio, where he says he still goes to meet with his “social club.” As the tune of Katy Perry’s “Roar” blasts, teachers wave pom-poms, and kids hold up signs including “Autism is my Super Power.”

San Antonio’s abilitySTRONG Parade…this Weekend!

Samuel Allen Grand Marshal

Everyone loves a parade! Especially when it’s the annual abilitySTRONG Parade, San Antonio’s inaugural Disability Pride Celebration. It is a public expression of the belief that disability is a natural and beautiful part of human diversity in which people living with disabilities can take pride. We have all your information of where to park, parade route and a list of all the activities slated to participate in beautiful downtown San Antonio!

The Parade Theme Awareness….We’re Stronger Together, resonates strongly with this year’s Grand Marshal Samuel Allen. “Upon hearing of my Autism diagnosis, I learned that my voice mattered above all the medical noise of what I will never be able to accomplish. That voice would mold me into all I could be or it would stifle me into less than.”


Event Checklist:

2nd Annual abilitySTRONG Parade
Saturday, October 26th, 2019
9:00 am  – 10:00 am
Downtown, San Antonio

Parade Route: Avenue E & East Houston St. in front of First Presbyterian Church and Express News Bldg. South on Avenue E, West on Houston St. North on Flores St., West on Travis St., South on San Saba, East on Commerce St., South Pecos-La Trinidad and into the UTSA Cattleman Square parking lot.

Event Parking: Accessible shuttle services will be available between all of the ​lots below and Market Square from 7am – 2:30pm.UTSA D1 & D2 Lots
Employee A and B, and unmarked surface spaces.
*UTSA Geo Development Lot (On San Saba between Dolorosa & W. Nueva)
*Washington Square Lot (Santa Rosa & Nueva/Dolorosa)
*Washington Place Lot (Next to La Quinta on Dolorosa & South Santa Rosa)
*City Parking Lot (PAID PARKING Parking is available in the City Parking lot at Dolorosa between Santa Rosa and Laredo)

Event Program

A Life In Paint: How One Adult With Asperger’s Found His Place in the World Through Art

An Aspergers101 Exclusive with Artist Carl Parker

I happened upon the brilliance of Carl Parker by accident. He had engaged in a discussion on the Aspergers101 Facebook Page and his positive nature was very apparent among the sea of negative comments. Found out quickly that Carl is the real deal! His positive outlook and adult Asperger diagnosis proved to be a powerful combination when creating his artwork. Each piece tells a story that he narrates via blogs. He describes each creation with a beauty that allows it’s viewers a rare glimpse into his world. I know this was no accidental encounter. So proud to share with our readers the brilliance & artistry of Carl.

About the Artist: Carl Parker is a dynamic, Canadian artist whose work focuses on the life experience. His style is abstract expressionist. He creates thought-provoking and emotionally engaging works and explores the beauty and subtlety of both rural and urban life, having experienced both himself.  His art can be found in private and corporate collections throughout the world, including Canada, the U.S., Australia, New Zealand and Europe. To date, he has shown his work in various cities including Toronto, Calgary, Florence, Italy and Paris.  His piece, Rustic Place, can currently be viewed at the Ontario Legislative Assembly’s In Camera Dining Room. 

Aspergers101: Clearly you are an artist with great talent. What inspires you?

Carl Parker: I began drawing at around age 8. I remember using a Spider-Man comic and being on my bedroom floor on my stomach. I was fascinated by how wonderful the character was drawn, so I attempted it myself. I was hooked. I’ve always been inspired by the human form. Over time, I would let my own style to develop with my painting of figures. I’m inspired by showing the emotions and complexities of us humans in my own, individual painting style.

Carl Parker shown with his work “Rustic Place” which is currently on display in the Ontario Legislature’s In Camera Dining Room.

Aspergers101: Upon learning you were diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, did this affect your art in any way? Do you think it plays a part?

Carl Parker: I feel the Asperger’s plays a part in my unusual style. It pushed me to always be different in everything I do. This always felt like a sense of healthy pride for me, and never a weakness. To me, the Asperger’s is absolutely was not a negative. It gave me ambition to be a good artist. My late-in-life diagnosis was good for me, I wanted to know, and have since become a very level and successful person in this beautiful world of ours. Nobody paints like me. That makes me smile.

The person on the spectrum CAN experience triumphs of massive proportions. They CAN contribute important things to the world.

Carl Parker

Aspergers101: How would you describe the meaning in your paintings…are they connected?

Carl Parker: When someone sees and/or feels something in my art, I have done my job. I’ve contributed something and when the viewer connects with the piece, I feel joy and excitement because I’ve translated a piece of life, effectively in a powerful way. When a person has Asperger’s, they can often feel the need to isolate themselves from people and society in general, but with my art, I can connect with people. This is huge in such a healthy and progressive way. For me, my art is actually therapy. They say people with Asperger’s have a hard time showing their emotions and seem cold. In my paintings, people find emotion. It’s a magnificent thing when emotion is found, both for me and the viewer. I’ve noticed my art has the power to transcend all worries, hang-ups, negativity, and the pointless aspects of the trivial sort of mind. All pettiness begins to fall away. How brilliant this is.

Upcoming Event: Jennifer Allen to Speak at ACU Summit 2019

“The Less Traveled Path to Christ: Families, Autism and the Church Today”

Autism, depression, anxiety, ADHD, and developmental delays often keep kids (and parents) away from church. The Great Commission instructs us to go and preach the gospel to all nations, to all people … and as for those with disabilities, we must put aside our fear of “different” by first understanding the uniquely wired brain and then providing accommodation(s). Jennifer Allen will share her family’s personal journey of having a child diagnosed with autism and how the less traveled path to Jesus, though oftentimes rocky, offers beautiful vistas that neurotypicals seldom witness. This session is for the church to better understand the challenges that face these families along with suggested accommodations and especially for the parent torn about church and their children.

THE FACTS:

When: Tuesday, September 17th

Time: 9:30a – 10:15a

Where: ACU Summit on the Campus of Abilene Christian University 

               ACU Biblical Studies Building 1201850 Teague Boulevard

               Abilene, TX 79601 – Room 120

Cost: Free

Go to ACU Website for full information on ACU Summit 2019  or view the full ACU Summit 2019 Program here. Note: Jennifer Allen’s presentation: The Less Traveled Path to Christ: Families, Autism and the Church Today is listed on page 23.

Upcoming Event! Jennifer Allen to Speak at ACU Summit

“The Less Traveled Path to Christ: Families, Autism and the Church Today”

Jennifer Allen, 9:30-10:15 AM

Autism, depression, anxiety, ADHD, and developmental delays often keep kids (and parents) away from church. The Great Commission instructs us to go and preach the gospel to all nations, to all people … and as for those with disabilities, we must put aside our fear of “different” by first understanding the uniquely wired brain and then providing accommodation(s). Jennifer Allen will share her family’s personal journey of having a child diagnosed with autism and how the less traveled path to Jesus, though oftentimes rocky, offers beautiful vistas that neurotypicals seldom witness. This session is for the church to better understand the challenges that face these families along with suggested accommodations and especially for the parent torn about church and their children.

THE FACTS:

When: Tuesday, September 17th

Time: 9:30a – 10:15a

Where: ACU Summit on the Campus of Abilene Christian University 

               ACU Biblical Studies Building 1201850 Teague Boulevard

               Abilene, TX 79601 – Room 120

Cost: Free

Go to ACU Website for full information on ACU Summit 2019  or download the full ACU Summit 2019 Program here. Note: Jennifer Allen’s presentation: The Less Traveled Path to Christ: Families, Autism and the Church Today is listed on page 23.

San Antonio Family’s Autism Education Efforts Lead to New State Law

by: Roseanna Garza/Rivard Report
August 29th 2019

“A patrol officer driving on a local freeway came across a young man wielding a two-by-four in the middle of the inside lane as cars zoomed quickly past. Upon approaching him, the officer, whom SAPD declined to identify, quickly recognized the youth had a cognitive impairment and was not suffering from mental health or substance abuse issues.

Using communication skills learned from the Allens, the officer talked the young man into putting the piece of lumber down, and then helped him get off the freeway and return safely home.”

-San Antonio Police Chief William McManus  (for the rest of this story, click on the link above)

BONNIE ARBITTIER / RIVARD REPORT

Aspergers 101 Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, we've answered 101 of your questions about Asperger Syndrome!

Whether you are beginning to suspect your child (or yourself) might have a form of Autism or Asperger Syndrome, or you are already on your journey, this resource was compiled for you!

We polled the 101 top requested questions on Asperger Syndrome and put them in one place for those seeking information on High Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome! These questions range from the origins of Asperger Syndrome, the early signs all the way through adulthood. Some questions merited a one word response while others provide you with a detailed bullet-point answer. We would like to thank our underwriting sponsor: The Starfish Social Club for supporting and providing you this on-going free resource! To access Aspergers101 FAQ page either click on the ad below or find it  permanently located at the top of our menu bar on our website under the “Asperger Syndrome” tab. 

Click on above to go to 101 FAQ Page

 

Allow them their Space

“It seems that for success in science or art, a dash of autism is essential”

-Hans Asperger

 

Give the Gift of Information!

DVD: "Coping to Excelling: Solutions for School-Age Children Diagnosed with Autism or Asperger Syndrome"

Excellent basic overview of High Functioning Autism and Aspergers Syndrome!

The Coping to Excelling documentary sheds illuminating light on the topic of High-Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome in school-aged children. Narrated by a Mother of a son with Asperger’s, this engaging program allows the viewer to ‘see through the eyes’ of those on the high end of the autism spectrum while getting advice from experts such as Dr. Temple Grandin, Dr. Tony Attwood, Jennifer McIlwee Myers, Billy Edwards and many more!

“I would strongly recommend the Coping to Excelling DVD not only for parents, especially those of a newly diagnosed child, but also for teachers and professionals!”

– Dr. Tony Attwood

 

 

 

The DVD, Coping to Excelling, is divided into 5 chapters each lasting just over 10 minutes. The chapters may be viewed independently or the entire Documentary (lasting 68 minutes) may be viewed in it’s entirety.

Chapters include:

  • Understanding High-Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome – a broad overview
  • The Family Unit – The importance thereof
  • Choices in Education – Pro’s and con’s of all methods
  • Bullying – re-enactments and solutions
  • Social Development – suggestions and tools from the experts

 

Purchase Here

 

 

Product details

Aspergers101 helps families cope with autism

San Antonio Express-News

(The following article by Staff Writer, Rene A. Guzman, originally ran in the San Antonio Express-News on November 19th 2018)

It’s been more than a dozen years since Jennifer Allen first learned that her oldest son, Sam, had Asperger Syndrome, now diagnosed as high-functioning autism. And still she remembers how fast her sadness turned to relief.

At last she knew why Sam, who was 10 at the time, always isolated himself from the other kids in class. Why he could never finish a sentence without losing his train of thought. Why despite being bright his grades suffered.

“I knew that I’d be able to understand my son a lot better,” Allen said. “It was a breakthrough.”

SA Gives story on Aspergers101, a San Antonio-based website resource for people with high-functioning austism and asperger syndrome. Jennifer Allen (left) founded the site, inspired by her son Samuel (right), who has been diagnosed with high-functioning autism. (Kin Man Hui/San Antonio Express-News)

It was also the beginning of a mission to help other families identify and understand Asperger’s, with Sam as both guide and inspiration for how to succeed with such a complex and often bewildering neurological condition.

“Eventually we got the hang of how to deal with my autism,” said Sam Allen, now 23 and about to graduate from college with a degree in engineering. “But we decided we wanted to give these other parents the opportunity to get the information that they need in order for their child to cope with their autism. We didn’t want them to be in the same position we were, when we were in the complete dark about autism.”

That’s why mother and son founded Aspergers101, a San Antonio nonprofit dedicated to educating and empowering all lives touched by Asperger’s and high-functioning autism.